“Why don’t we see Him more?” is a line from the Christmas song, “Where is the line to see Jesus?” by Steve Haupt and Chris Loesch.

It reminds me of a scene from the movie, Prince Caspian. Lucy sees Aslan, the character who represents Jesus, in the distance but the others don’t. When they ask her why they didn’t see him, Lucy gives these answers. “Maybe you weren’t looking for him,” and later, “Maybe you don’t want to see him.” Likewise we are not always looking for Jesus to be present in our daily lives and we don’t always want to see him.

Looking for Jesus suggests our dependency on him. It requires us to acknowledge our inadequacies, that we are not as self-sufficient as we thought. It is interesting that of the four children in Prince Caspian it was Lucy that saw Aslan. She was the youngest, the one who was not trying to be mature or assume authority but the one who was most trusting. Somehow we lose this when we become teenagers and adults. I’m sure I did. For some reason I feel the need to impress, sometimes even myself, with my own proficiency. Yet to see more of Jesus in my life, I must cultivate the same child like trust that Lucy had.

Furthermore perhaps we don’t always want to see him. Seeing Jesus is challenging. We may sense his conviction when all we want is comfort. We may sense his calling when all we want is to be left in peace. We may sense his holiness when all we want is to be left in our selfishness. Being in God’s presence changes us and I know I don’t always want to change. Yet he only changes us for our benefit to heal us of our brokenness and free us from our burdens.

How do we see Jesus? We live in 2012 not in Narnia or even ancient Palestine so we certainly don’t see him with our physical eyes but rather with our spiritual eyes. We become aware of Jesus’ presence in our life when we realize he is orchestrating our circumstances and we notice the little coincidences. We notice a bird, a sunset, the laughter of a child and realize that God is behind every blessing. So often I am too busy to notice, too distracted by other concerns to stop and take the time to say thank you, Lord. And when I stop saying thank you, I stop acknowledging his presence and then I stop seeing the evidence of his presence in my life.

If we aren’t looking for him then others won’t see Jesus in us either. The world desperately needs to see Jesus and the only way they will see him is through the lives of his followers. As we seek Jesus, trust him, thank him, others will see Jesus in us.

This Christmas allow a watching world see the life of Jesus in you.