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Titus 1

January 3, 2009

Here’s how the study works: Read the chapter mentioned in the heading several times during the week and share any words, thoughts, verses that stood out to you. Having a week for a chapter creates the opportunity to reread it several times and make additional comments as you feel inclined as well as make comments on other people’s insights.

by Susan Barnes
24

Susan Barnes

~ writer of insightful posts about God and faith

24 thoughts on “Titus 1”

  1. Paul has some very blunt words to say about the Cretans in v.10-16. The Message is even blunter:

    For there are a lot of rebels out there, full of loose, confusing, and deceiving talk. Those who were brought up religious and ought to know better are the worst. They’ve got to be shut up (v10-11).

    How interesting that the worse ones are those who were “brought up religious”.

    I think, amongst other things, it is a challenge to parents not just to bring up children with a ‘head’ understanding of the gospel but to ensure they understand the need to have a heart relationship with God. Children, even our own, need to be challenged with the claims of Christ.

  2. Paul has some very blunt words to say about the Cretans in v.10-16. The Message is even blunter:

    For there are a lot of rebels out there, full of loose, confusing, and deceiving talk. Those who were brought up religious and ought to know better are the worst. They’ve got to be shut up (v10-11).

    How interesting that the worse ones are those who were “brought up religious”.

    I think, amongst other things, it is a challenge to parents not just to bring up children with a ‘head’ understanding of the gospel but to ensure they understand the need to have a heart relationship with God. Children, even our own, need to be challenged with the claims of Christ.

  3. Alison C

    What a HUGE task Titus was given??
    Yes, Susan,[our children] but more so; ourselves [me!] need to be challenged with the claims of Christ.

  4. Alison C

    What a HUGE task Titus was given??
    Yes, Susan,[our children] but more so; ourselves [me!] need to be challenged with the claims of Christ.

  5. Yes, Alison, I agree and you’re right it was a huge task. Not only does he have to appoint elders in every town (I wonder how that went – obviously the church members didn’t vote!) but also it seems that Paul is giving him the task of “silencing” the rebellious people. I wonder how he did that.

  6. Yes, Alison, I agree and you’re right it was a huge task. Not only does he have to appoint elders in every town (I wonder how that went – obviously the church members didn’t vote!) but also it seems that Paul is giving him the task of “silencing” the rebellious people. I wonder how he did that.

  7. I’ve just noticed Paul actually tells Titus, referring to the rebellious people of the circumcision group, to “rebuke them sharply” (v.13). Poor Titus!

  8. I’ve just noticed Paul actually tells Titus, referring to the rebellious people of the circumcision group, to “rebuke them sharply” (v.13). Poor Titus!

  9. Paul was very clear on his purpose (v.1) “to further the faith of God’s elect and their knowledge of the truth.”

  10. Paul was very clear on his purpose (v.1) “to further the faith of God’s elect and their knowledge of the truth.”

  11. Hi Susan, I am new. Thank you for doing this. I have been looking for just such a study. I am in the USA, and it is still Wed. evening here.

  12. Hi Susan, I am new. Thank you for doing this. I have been looking for just such a study. I am in the USA, and it is still Wed. evening here.

  13. I am struck by the high standard Paul sets forth for the elders
    “He must be blameless…his children must believe and not be open to the charge of being wild…”
    I don’t know of many men, deacons or elders who really live up to theses standards.

  14. I am struck by the high standard Paul sets forth for the elders
    “He must be blameless…his children must believe and not be open to the charge of being wild…”
    I don’t know of many men, deacons or elders who really live up to theses standards.

  15. Poor commentary on North Americans in general. LOL

    North Americans in churches today sort of fit with the Cretans.

    “Cretans are always liars, evil brutes, lazy gluttons.” LOLOL

    Sorry I know there are good men at the head of some of our churches out there … but as Deborah says they are few and far between.

    I know a guy who is part of the leadership of a church who doesn’t get up until noon.

    Sorry for the negativity but that is the way it is over here Sue.

    Our churches are run like businesses and getting people to join your church hopefully means more money in the pastors pockets and maybe a trip to Florida in the winter. Egads

    No wonder there aren’t any real miracles anymore. ???

    I agree, poor Titus … what if he couldn’t find as many men as he needed who fit the bill?

    The grace of the Gospel was so fresh then. There was so much power that accompanied them when they delivered the salvation message.

    Love ruled most of the time in those days. Paul was a little hard headed though sometimes and I’m sure there were lots of lessons he learned the hard way.

    I’m so glad that the Lord doesn’t hide the personalities of those He sent … they weren’t flawless but their hearts were on fire and they were willing to give their lives for Christ.

  16. Poor commentary on North Americans in general. LOL

    North Americans in churches today sort of fit with the Cretans.

    “Cretans are always liars, evil brutes, lazy gluttons.” LOLOL

    Sorry I know there are good men at the head of some of our churches out there … but as Deborah says they are few and far between.

    I know a guy who is part of the leadership of a church who doesn’t get up until noon.

    Sorry for the negativity but that is the way it is over here Sue.

    Our churches are run like businesses and getting people to join your church hopefully means more money in the pastors pockets and maybe a trip to Florida in the winter. Egads

    No wonder there aren’t any real miracles anymore. ???

    I agree, poor Titus … what if he couldn’t find as many men as he needed who fit the bill?

    The grace of the Gospel was so fresh then. There was so much power that accompanied them when they delivered the salvation message.

    Love ruled most of the time in those days. Paul was a little hard headed though sometimes and I’m sure there were lots of lessons he learned the hard way.

    I’m so glad that the Lord doesn’t hide the personalities of those He sent … they weren’t flawless but their hearts were on fire and they were willing to give their lives for Christ.

  17. Hi Deborah, good to have you drop by.

    In regard to the qualifications of elders, the Amplified Bible says “unquestionable integrity” rather than “blameless” another version talks about having a “good reputation”. In a Jewish context I imagine children to be those up to 12 years old.

    At times we sometimes struggle to find good leadership in Australia. I personally think one of the (many) reasons is we don’t train our young people to take on small leadership tasks at a young age. If we consider children were more or less considered adults from 12, then we should start expecting them to be more involved in the life of the church then they generally are at that age. For example teenagers are quite capable of doing the Bible reading, public prayer and other upfront roles. I’ve been in churches where the teenagers have virtually run the Sunday School program. So when these teenagers are in their twenties and thirties they are better prepared and more willing to take on more major leadership roles.

    And I agree, Val, we get to see the personalites of God’s leaders and they weren’t flawless, so I don’t expect the elders Titus chose were either.

  18. Hi Deborah, good to have you drop by.

    In regard to the qualifications of elders, the Amplified Bible says “unquestionable integrity” rather than “blameless” another version talks about having a “good reputation”. In a Jewish context I imagine children to be those up to 12 years old.

    At times we sometimes struggle to find good leadership in Australia. I personally think one of the (many) reasons is we don’t train our young people to take on small leadership tasks at a young age. If we consider children were more or less considered adults from 12, then we should start expecting them to be more involved in the life of the church then they generally are at that age. For example teenagers are quite capable of doing the Bible reading, public prayer and other upfront roles. I’ve been in churches where the teenagers have virtually run the Sunday School program. So when these teenagers are in their twenties and thirties they are better prepared and more willing to take on more major leadership roles.

    And I agree, Val, we get to see the personalites of God’s leaders and they weren’t flawless, so I don’t expect the elders Titus chose were either.

  19. After Paul says, “rebuke them sharply” he adds the reason “so that they will be sound in the faith” (v.13). His motive wasn’t that they would go away or leave Titus alone, but rather that they would be restored.

  20. After Paul says, “rebuke them sharply” he adds the reason “so that they will be sound in the faith” (v.13). His motive wasn’t that they would go away or leave Titus alone, but rather that they would be restored.

  21. More on v.13

    In our culture we are very reluctant to rebuke people for fear of offending them and because we see personal faith as very individualistic. It would be more Biblical to teach people not to be offended when they are corrected rather than being paralysed in fear and not correcting anyone because we are afraid of giving offence.

  22. More on v.13

    In our culture we are very reluctant to rebuke people for fear of offending them and because we see personal faith as very individualistic. It would be more Biblical to teach people not to be offended when they are corrected rather than being paralysed in fear and not correcting anyone because we are afraid of giving offence.

  23. v.16 They claim to know God, but by their actions they deny him.

    (From Constable’s commentary) "The dominant theme in Titus is good works (1:8, 16; 2:7, 14; 3:1, 8, 14), that is, exemplary Christian behavior and that for the sake of outsiders (2:5, 7, 8, 10, 11; 3:1, 8)."

  24. v.16 They claim to know God, but by their actions they deny him.

    (From Constable’s commentary) "The dominant theme in Titus is good works (1:8, 16; 2:7, 14; 3:1, 8, 14), that is, exemplary Christian behavior and that for the sake of outsiders (2:5, 7, 8, 10, 11; 3:1, 8)."

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