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Jonah 4

December 12, 2008

Here’s how the study works: Read the chapter mentioned in the heading several times during the week and share any words, thoughts, verses that stood out to you. Having a week for a chapter creates the opportunity to reread it several times and make additional comments as you feel inclined as well as make comments on other people’s insights.

by Susan Barnes
8

Susan Barnes

~ writer of insightful posts about God and faith

8 thoughts on “Jonah 4”

  1. I always find it amazing how abruptly this book ends. I feel like someone has ripped out the last page.

    Was Jonah in such a sulk that he said nothing and there was no point God saying any more? I wonder if Jonah ever get over being angry?

  2. I always find it amazing how abruptly this book ends. I feel like someone has ripped out the last page.

    Was Jonah in such a sulk that he said nothing and there was no point God saying any more? I wonder if Jonah ever get over being angry?

  3. In v.2 we find Jonah was angry because God was gracious, compassionate, slow to anger, abounding in love and relents from sending calamity – which is rather an odd thing to be angry about!

  4. In v.2 we find Jonah was angry because God was gracious, compassionate, slow to anger, abounding in love and relents from sending calamity – which is rather an odd thing to be angry about!

  5. After Jonah’s angry burst at God he sit and waits “to see what would happen to the city” (v.5).

    Did he think God was going to say, “Oops I got it wrong. Jonah’s right, I better destroy Nineveh afterall.”

    lol

  6. After Jonah’s angry burst at God he sit and waits “to see what would happen to the city” (v.5).

    Did he think God was going to say, “Oops I got it wrong. Jonah’s right, I better destroy Nineveh afterall.”

    lol

  7. v.11 And should I not have concern for the great city of Nineveh, in which there are more than a hundred and twenty thousand people who cannot tell their right hand from their left—and also many animals?”

    This is the climax of the book, that God is more concerned with the lost than our comfort (v.7-8). Like Jonah we often need a perspective adjustment.

  8. v.11 And should I not have concern for the great city of Nineveh, in which there are more than a hundred and twenty thousand people who cannot tell their right hand from their left—and also many animals?”

    This is the climax of the book, that God is more concerned with the lost than our comfort (v.7-8). Like Jonah we often need a perspective adjustment.

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