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1 Timothy 3

August 15, 2009

Here’s how the study works: Read the chapter mentioned in the heading several times during the week and share any words, thoughts, verses that stood out to you. Having a week for a chapter creates the opportunity to reread it several times and make additional comments as you feel inclined as well as make comments on other people’s insights.

by Susan Barnes
26

Susan Barnes

~ writer of insightful posts about God and faith

26 thoughts on “1 Timothy 3”

  1. I find it interesting and marginally comforting that the women aren't expected to "manage their families well and children obey with respect" even thought in these days the mothers are the main source of the children's rearing

  2. I find it interesting and marginally comforting that the women aren't expected to "manage their families well and children obey with respect" even thought in these days the mothers are the main source of the children's rearing

  3. Indeed, in those days men didn't go "off to work" like they do these days.

    It is also interesting when you get to v. 8-13 to realize that there was no word in the Greek language for deaconess at the time Paul wrote. Meaning the word deacon is both male and female which probably explains why the Message puts v.12 this way: Servants in the church are to be committed to their spouses, attentive to their own children…

    I think there is less emphasis on women looking after their families because they tend to be more nurturing and more relational already.

  4. Indeed, in those days men didn't go "off to work" like they do these days.

    It is also interesting when you get to v. 8-13 to realize that there was no word in the Greek language for deaconess at the time Paul wrote. Meaning the word deacon is both male and female which probably explains why the Message puts v.12 this way: Servants in the church are to be committed to their spouses, attentive to their own children…

    I think there is less emphasis on women looking after their families because they tend to be more nurturing and more relational already.

  5. It seems that after all the instructions in regard to leadership Paul then refocuses on the really important in v.16, Jesus.

    It is easy to get distracted with the obligations of leadership and lose sight of who we are following.

  6. It seems that after all the instructions in regard to leadership Paul then refocuses on the really important in v.16, Jesus.

    It is easy to get distracted with the obligations of leadership and lose sight of who we are following.

  7. oh, I assumed Paul was addressing the men only here because women were not allowed to teach and lead in the church, but had other roles.

  8. oh, I assumed Paul was addressing the men only here because women were not allowed to teach and lead in the church, but had other roles.

  9. The few remaining Calvinists in the world have declared this a non negotiable issue; as it is unmistakeably the original message to that church at that time. I'm not in agreement that it is relevant for today, but the problem is where to draw the line between acceptance of the literal word and looking for it's relevance in today's society. I'm not here to argue either as I deeply appreciate women in leadership positions. God's work is accomplished in so many different ways than the early church ever envisioned.

  10. The few remaining Calvinists in the world have declared this a non negotiable issue; as it is unmistakeably the original message to that church at that time. I'm not in agreement that it is relevant for today, but the problem is where to draw the line between acceptance of the literal word and looking for it's relevance in today's society. I'm not here to argue either as I deeply appreciate women in leadership positions. God's work is accomplished in so many different ways than the early church ever envisioned.

  11. Paul's comments about leadership need to be taken in context of the male dominated culture that he was writing to. Paul would not have realized we would be reading his letters 2,000 years later.

    Also it seems many women did play leadership roles in the early church: Lydia (Acts 16); Priscilla (Acts 18 and elsewhere); Junias (Romans 16:7); Phoebe (Romans 16:1).

  12. Paul's comments about leadership need to be taken in context of the male dominated culture that he was writing to. Paul would not have realized we would be reading his letters 2,000 years later.

    Also it seems many women did play leadership roles in the early church: Lydia (Acts 16); Priscilla (Acts 18 and elsewhere); Junias (Romans 16:7); Phoebe (Romans 16:1).

  13. v.1-13

    These verses present a picture of a twofold leadership structure of elders (oversight) and deacons (servants). The qualifications for elder and deacon are mostly about character not on gifts or talents. Apparently the Jews were familiar with the role of elder from their heritage whereas the role of deacon came about in the early church (Acts 6:1-7).

  14. v.1-13

    These verses present a picture of a twofold leadership structure of elders (oversight) and deacons (servants). The qualifications for elder and deacon are mostly about character not on gifts or talents. Apparently the Jews were familiar with the role of elder from their heritage whereas the role of deacon came about in the early church (Acts 6:1-7).

  15. v.7 He must also have a good reputation with outsiders, so that he will not fall into disgrace and into the devil’s trap.

    (From Constable’s commentary) "A good reputation outside the church" with unbelievers is essential so that he will not bring reproach on the name of Christ and the church. "Does he pay his bills? Does he have a good reputation among unsaved people with whom he does business?

  16. v.7 He must also have a good reputation with outsiders, so that he will not fall into disgrace and into the devil’s trap.

    (From Constable’s commentary) "A good reputation outside the church" with unbelievers is essential so that he will not bring reproach on the name of Christ and the church. "Does he pay his bills? Does he have a good reputation among unsaved people with whom he does business?

  17. v.9 They must keep hold of the deep truths of the faith with a clear conscience.

    With a clear conscience, that is, lives in accordance with his beliefs. His actions and his words don’t disagree.

  18. v.9 They must keep hold of the deep truths of the faith with a clear conscience.

    With a clear conscience, that is, lives in accordance with his beliefs. His actions and his words don’t disagree.

  19. v.10 They must first be tested; and then if there is nothing against them, let them serve as deacons.

    Paul does not say what sort of test so perhaps it is the test of time (v.6)

  20. v.10 They must first be tested; and then if there is nothing against them, let them serve as deacons.

    Paul does not say what sort of test so perhaps it is the test of time (v.6)

  21. v.13 Those who have served well gain an excellent standing and great assurance in their faith in Christ Jesus.

    There are benefits to serving.

  22. v.13 Those who have served well gain an excellent standing and great assurance in their faith in Christ Jesus.

    There are benefits to serving.

  23. v.15 If I am delayed, you will know how people ought to conduct themselves in God’s household, which is the church of the living God

    The church is described in terms of a household, not a club, not an army, or a business. So it should conduct its affairs like a family, sometimes a very big family.

  24. v.15 If I am delayed, you will know how people ought to conduct themselves in God’s household, which is the church of the living God

    The church is described in terms of a household, not a club, not an army, or a business. So it should conduct its affairs like a family, sometimes a very big family.

  25. v.16 Beyond all question, the mystery of godliness is great:

    It is indeed a mystery how our faith makes us right with God.

  26. v.16 Beyond all question, the mystery of godliness is great:

    It is indeed a mystery how our faith makes us right with God.

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