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1 Corinthians 5

March 5, 2010

Here’s how the study works: Read the chapter mentioned in the heading several times during the week and share any words, thoughts, verses that stood out to you. Having a week for a chapter creates the opportunity to reread it several times and make additional comments as you feel inclined as well as make comments on other people’s insights.

by Susan Barnes
14

Susan Barnes

~ writer of insightful posts about God and faith

14 thoughts on “1 Corinthians 5”

  1. I have been stricken with the verses 1 & 2 of this chapter. The Apostle Paul hears this widespread report that the church there in Corinth has a man that is committing incest and the church members are going merrily along with no thought about this great sin among them. Paul says even the pagans are appalled at this kind of sin. I have to ask myself "why in the world would a church overlook or ignore this type of blatant sin in their church?"

    I did some further research on the city of Corinth during the time Paul wrote this letter to the church there. This was a popular business city, lots of trading, buying, selling of goods. It was also the location of the temple and statue of Aphrodite, the goddess of love and fertility. Many worshipped Aphrodite and sexual activities were a regular part of the worship times. It makes sense then to me that some of those Aphrodite worshippers were converted to Christianity. They brought their former acts of worship with them and saw nothing wrong with them. Those who sat under Paul's teaching while he was in Corinth knew that these sexual acts were wrong, but they chose to ignore it. That's a dangerous place to let yourself get to.

  2. I have been stricken with the verses 1 & 2 of this chapter. The Apostle Paul hears this widespread report that the church there in Corinth has a man that is committing incest and the church members are going merrily along with no thought about this great sin among them. Paul says even the pagans are appalled at this kind of sin. I have to ask myself "why in the world would a church overlook or ignore this type of blatant sin in their church?"

    I did some further research on the city of Corinth during the time Paul wrote this letter to the church there. This was a popular business city, lots of trading, buying, selling of goods. It was also the location of the temple and statue of Aphrodite, the goddess of love and fertility. Many worshipped Aphrodite and sexual activities were a regular part of the worship times. It makes sense then to me that some of those Aphrodite worshippers were converted to Christianity. They brought their former acts of worship with them and saw nothing wrong with them. Those who sat under Paul's teaching while he was in Corinth knew that these sexual acts were wrong, but they chose to ignore it. That's a dangerous place to let yourself get to.

  3. Yes, it is hard to imagine how the church could ignore this type of behaviour. I sometimes find as Christians we tried so hard to be loving and non-offensive that we do not practice "tough love".

    I have also been reading Titus lately and Paul told Titus to "rebuke them sharply" (1:13) and these were people who were rebellious not necessarily engaging in immoral behaviour. It is also hard to imagine a church leader in our day, rebuking someone sharply. Seems to me we have a very softly, softly approach for fear of upsetting people, which perhaps was the problem in Corinth as well.

  4. Yes, it is hard to imagine how the church could ignore this type of behaviour. I sometimes find as Christians we tried so hard to be loving and non-offensive that we do not practice "tough love".

    I have also been reading Titus lately and Paul told Titus to "rebuke them sharply" (1:13) and these were people who were rebellious not necessarily engaging in immoral behaviour. It is also hard to imagine a church leader in our day, rebuking someone sharply. Seems to me we have a very softly, softly approach for fear of upsetting people, which perhaps was the problem in Corinth as well.

  5. This chapter seems to be devoted to this one issue. I find v.11 quite interesting:

    But now I am writing to you that you must not associate with any who claim to be fellow believers but are sexually immoral or greedy, idolaters or slanderers, drunkards or swindlers. With such persons do not even eat.

    I can almost hear people saying, "But these people will be offended if we don't eat with them." Seems to me though, Paul wasn't overly concerned about offending those who are Christians but doing the wrong thing.

  6. This chapter seems to be devoted to this one issue. I find v.11 quite interesting:

    But now I am writing to you that you must not associate with any who claim to be fellow believers but are sexually immoral or greedy, idolaters or slanderers, drunkards or swindlers. With such persons do not even eat.

    I can almost hear people saying, "But these people will be offended if we don't eat with them." Seems to me though, Paul wasn't overly concerned about offending those who are Christians but doing the wrong thing.

  7. The purpose of judging this person was ultimately that they would be restored (2 Cor 1:5-11). Church discipline is meant to lead to restoration.

  8. The purpose of judging this person was ultimately that they would be restored (2 Cor 1:5-11). Church discipline is meant to lead to restoration.

  9. v.1-2 It is actually reported that there is sexual immorality among you, and of a kind that even pagans do not tolerate: A man is sleeping with his father’s wife. And you are proud!

    It seems that Paul is more upset with the Corinthians' wrong attitude than he is about the sin. God is more interested in our heart attitude than we realize.

  10. v.1-2 It is actually reported that there is sexual immorality among you, and of a kind that even pagans do not tolerate: A man is sleeping with his father’s wife. And you are proud!

    It seems that Paul is more upset with the Corinthians' wrong attitude than he is about the sin. God is more interested in our heart attitude than we realize.

  11. v.7 Get rid of the old yeast, so that you may be a new unleavened batch—as you really are. For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed.

    We are the new batch without yeast because of Christ…"as you really are." We need to becomes what we are.

  12. v.7 Get rid of the old yeast, so that you may be a new unleavened batch—as you really are. For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed.

    We are the new batch without yeast because of Christ…"as you really are." We need to becomes what we are.

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