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1 Corinthians 10

April 10, 2010

Here’s how the study works: Read the chapter mentioned in the heading several times during the week and share any words, thoughts, verses that stood out to you. Having a week for a chapter creates the opportunity to reread it several times and make additional comments as you feel inclined as well as make comments on other people’s insights.

by Susan Barnes
18

Susan Barnes

~ writer of insightful posts about God and faith

18 thoughts on “1 Corinthians 10”

  1. I'm intrigued by v.4 that says:
    "and all drank the same spiritual drink. For they drank from the spiritual Rock that followed them, and the Rock was Christ." (ESV)

    I liked this commentary on this verse and feel it explains it well.

    1 Corinthians 10:4
    This representation of the Messiah, perhaps, was understood by Paul to consist in the following things:

    (1) Christians, like the children of Israel, are passing through the world as pilgrims, and to them that world is a wilderness-a desert.

    (2) They need continued supplies, as the Israelites did, in their journey. The world, like that wilderness, does not meet their necessities, or supply their needs.

    (3) That rock was a striking representation of the fulness of the Messiah, of the abundant grace which he imparts to his people.

    (4) It was an illustration of their continued and constant dependence on him for the daily supply of their needs. Bloomfield translates it: "and they were supplied with drink from the spiritual Rock which followed them, even Christ." The design of the apostle was, to show that this "attending Rock," the Messiah, was the source of all their blessings, and particularly of the water that gushed from the rock. It is to show to the Corinthians, who relied so much on their privileges, and felt themselves so secure, that the Jews had the very same privileges-had the highest tokens of the divine favor and protection, were under the guidance and grace of God, and were partakers constantly of that which adumbrated or typified the Messiah, in a manner as real, and in a form as much suited to keep up the remembrance of their dependence, as even the bread and wine in the Lord's Supper.
    (from Barnes' Notes, Electronic Database Copyright © 1997, 2003, 2005, 2006 by Biblesoft, Inc. All rights reserved.)

  2. I'm intrigued by v.4 that says:
    "and all drank the same spiritual drink. For they drank from the spiritual Rock that followed them, and the Rock was Christ." (ESV)

    I liked this commentary on this verse and feel it explains it well.

    1 Corinthians 10:4
    This representation of the Messiah, perhaps, was understood by Paul to consist in the following things:

    (1) Christians, like the children of Israel, are passing through the world as pilgrims, and to them that world is a wilderness-a desert.

    (2) They need continued supplies, as the Israelites did, in their journey. The world, like that wilderness, does not meet their necessities, or supply their needs.

    (3) That rock was a striking representation of the fulness of the Messiah, of the abundant grace which he imparts to his people.

    (4) It was an illustration of their continued and constant dependence on him for the daily supply of their needs. Bloomfield translates it: "and they were supplied with drink from the spiritual Rock which followed them, even Christ." The design of the apostle was, to show that this "attending Rock," the Messiah, was the source of all their blessings, and particularly of the water that gushed from the rock. It is to show to the Corinthians, who relied so much on their privileges, and felt themselves so secure, that the Jews had the very same privileges-had the highest tokens of the divine favor and protection, were under the guidance and grace of God, and were partakers constantly of that which adumbrated or typified the Messiah, in a manner as real, and in a form as much suited to keep up the remembrance of their dependence, as even the bread and wine in the Lord's Supper.
    (from Barnes' Notes, Electronic Database Copyright © 1997, 2003, 2005, 2006 by Biblesoft, Inc. All rights reserved.)

  3. I especially like (3) "the abundant grace which he imparts to his people" but we need to "drink" in order to receive.

    The thing that challenges me is that despite them all going through the same experiences they did not all have the same response. Some responded in faith, most did not. So it is not so much what happens to us (doesn't matter if we have heaps of spiritual experiences) but the important thing is how will respond to it. Will we respond with faith?

  4. I especially like (3) "the abundant grace which he imparts to his people" but we need to "drink" in order to receive.

    The thing that challenges me is that despite them all going through the same experiences they did not all have the same response. Some responded in faith, most did not. So it is not so much what happens to us (doesn't matter if we have heaps of spiritual experiences) but the important thing is how will respond to it. Will we respond with faith?

  5. In v.23 we have a repeat of 6:12 except the final phrase. Instead of “I will not be mastered by anything”, this time Paul concludes “not everything is constructive” which is a bit broader.

  6. In v.23 we have a repeat of 6:12 except the final phrase. Instead of “I will not be mastered by anything”, this time Paul concludes “not everything is constructive” which is a bit broader.

  7. I can't help but wonder, when I read v.27-28, what happened if you were half way through eating and suddenly your host announces: This has been offered in sacrifice.

  8. I can't help but wonder, when I read v.27-28, what happened if you were half way through eating and suddenly your host announces: This has been offered in sacrifice.

  9. In v. 12,13 I am drawn by personal application. Sometimes as Christians we feel that we have gotten to a place of strong faith and we can withstand any temptation. NOT SO! We can fall from any level and the higher the level, the farther the fall.

    Many people misinterpret v.13 to mean that God won't put any more on you than you can bear. We say this to one another as words of comfort when tragedy strikes. But this verse doesn't say that at all. It says that no temptation will give us no alternative but to sin, because God will always give us a way to escape the tempatation. Quite a different meaning isn't it.

    12"Therefore, let anyone who thinks that he stands take heed lest he fall." (ESV)

    13"No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it." (ESV)

  10. In v. 12,13 I am drawn by personal application. Sometimes as Christians we feel that we have gotten to a place of strong faith and we can withstand any temptation. NOT SO! We can fall from any level and the higher the level, the farther the fall.

    Many people misinterpret v.13 to mean that God won't put any more on you than you can bear. We say this to one another as words of comfort when tragedy strikes. But this verse doesn't say that at all. It says that no temptation will give us no alternative but to sin, because God will always give us a way to escape the tempatation. Quite a different meaning isn't it.

    12"Therefore, let anyone who thinks that he stands take heed lest he fall." (ESV)

    13"No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it." (ESV)

  11. Yes, I remind myself of v.12 whenever I hear about Christian falling into temptation.

    I also agree with what you are saying about v.13. However there are other verses in the Bible that give us comfort to know that God won't allow more than we can bear. Hebrews 2:14-18; John 16:12; Psalm 103:13-14 also Job 1 & 2.

  12. Yes, I remind myself of v.12 whenever I hear about Christian falling into temptation.

    I also agree with what you are saying about v.13. However there are other verses in the Bible that give us comfort to know that God won't allow more than we can bear. Hebrews 2:14-18; John 16:12; Psalm 103:13-14 also Job 1 & 2.

  13. v.18-20 Consider the people of Israel: Do not those who eat the sacrifices participate in the altar? Do I mean then that food sacrificed to an idol is anything, or that an idol is anything? No, but the sacrifices of pagans are offered to demons, not to God, and I do not want you to be participants with demons.

    I was wondering what a modern day example of this would be? The thing that came to mind was yoga. I know of Christians who participate in this and feel it is harmless because they don't acknowledge its Eastern religious base. After reading this chapter though I think yoga is most dangerous than they realize.

  14. v.18-20 Consider the people of Israel: Do not those who eat the sacrifices participate in the altar? Do I mean then that food sacrificed to an idol is anything, or that an idol is anything? No, but the sacrifices of pagans are offered to demons, not to God, and I do not want you to be participants with demons.

    I was wondering what a modern day example of this would be? The thing that came to mind was yoga. I know of Christians who participate in this and feel it is harmless because they don't acknowledge its Eastern religious base. After reading this chapter though I think yoga is most dangerous than they realize.

  15. In reference to v.23-24 I read this in a commentary:

    Now he (Paul) went further and clarified that beneficial means beneficial for others, not just self.

  16. In reference to v.23-24 I read this in a commentary:

    Now he (Paul) went further and clarified that beneficial means beneficial for others, not just self.

  17. v.15 I speak to sensible people; judge for yourselves what I say.

    Christians are sensible people, we are called upon to use our minds. Biblical Christianity is rational and reasonable it is based on evidence that can be examined. No one has absolute proof about anything, we rely on high degrees of probability.

    Therefore we can feel confident about our faith knowing it will stand up to rigorous debate.

  18. v.15 I speak to sensible people; judge for yourselves what I say.

    Christians are sensible people, we are called upon to use our minds. Biblical Christianity is rational and reasonable it is based on evidence that can be examined. No one has absolute proof about anything, we rely on high degrees of probability.

    Therefore we can feel confident about our faith knowing it will stand up to rigorous debate.

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